Cassini’s Last Days

This+picture+was+taken+by+Cassini+on+November+28%2C+2005.+Since+then%2C+Cassini+has+taken+many+other+fascinating+pictures+of+Saturn+and+it%E2%80%99s+moons.+%28Photo+Credit%3A+NASA%2FJPL%2FSpace+Science+Institute%29
Back to Article
Back to Article

Cassini’s Last Days

This picture was taken by Cassini on November 28, 2005. Since then, Cassini has taken many other fascinating pictures of Saturn and it’s moons. (Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute)

This picture was taken by Cassini on November 28, 2005. Since then, Cassini has taken many other fascinating pictures of Saturn and it’s moons. (Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute)

This picture was taken by Cassini on November 28, 2005. Since then, Cassini has taken many other fascinating pictures of Saturn and it’s moons. (Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute)

This picture was taken by Cassini on November 28, 2005. Since then, Cassini has taken many other fascinating pictures of Saturn and it’s moons. (Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute)

Allyssa Maloney, Staff Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Imagine cascading into Saturn’s atmosphere, anticipating a fiery, inevitable death. That’s what Cassini, NASA’s 13-year Saturn mission, did on September 15th, 2017 at 6:30 A.M. Over the years, Cassini has been responsible for groundbreaking information on Saturn and it’s several moons.

But why did NASA put such a dramatic end to Cassini? The team that has been working with Cassini actually did it on purpose. The spacecraft had a risk of hitting one of Saturn‘s moons, which there were recent findings that two moons could be habitable for some form of life. These two moons are named Enceladus and Titan. If Cassini had hit one of them, it would have contaminated the moons with Earth particles and destroyed future experiments. The spacecraft’s demise actually began in April with several test dives into Saturn’s rings. Scientists used this to try to find out more about the composition and structure of Saturn’s atmosphere. The final dive was not just for fun, it was for more information on the atmosphere of Saturn.

With the camera attached, Cassini has been able to collect over 450,000 images. The photographs revealed information about Saturn never known, and the harsh death was worth the pictures. Cassini’s camera took pictures of everything from the moons, to the mysterious rings, and other phenomena we didn’t know happened. Junior Lauren Putman stated, “Cassini has taken some extraordinary pictures. Honestly, I wish my camera was that good.” Cassini traveled almost 5 billion miles, conducted every command properly, and completed 294 orbits. The world-shattering information and the phenomenal pictures will contribute to so many great discoveries in the future. Cassini will always be remembered as the beginning of something great.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    In the AP Class, Practice Makes Perfect

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    Dual Credit? More Like Cool Credit

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    Will You Go to Prom With Me?

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    Promposals Cause Unnecessary Stress

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    The Older, the Better

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    People, Stop Living in the Past: Why New Style Clothing is Better

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    Why Off Brand Products Are Better Than Name Brand Products

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    Brand Names are Winning the Race

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    Why Apple Watch Users Should Buy a Fitbit

  • Cassini’s Last Days

    Uncategorized

    Why Apple Watches are Better Than Fitbits

Navigate Right
Cassini’s Last Days