Lunar Eclipse 2018

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Lunar Eclipse 2018

Bob Chamberlain / Los Angeles Times

Bob Chamberlain / Los Angeles Times

Bob Chamberlain / Los Angeles Times

Hailey McCoy, Co-editor

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There are very few people who were not tuned in to watch the solar eclipse last summer. It was truly a national event, and the piles upon piles of solar eclipse glasses leftover can attest to that. This year, however, a lunar eclipse will be the focus of astrological events.

A lunar eclipse happens when the Moon, Earth, and Sun align, in that order. If the sky is clear, people will be able to see the Earth’s shadow on the moon up until the point of totality. At the point of totality, the Moon will turn a sort of dark red or copper color. These eclipses happen around four times per year and require no special eye wear to view them.

Unfortunately, the eclipse will only be completely visible to people who live west of the Rocky Mountains. People closer to the east coast will be able to see some of the eclipse, but will miss the point of totality.