The Honest Truth of AP Classes

Amanda Wampler, Staff Reporter

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High school is undoubtedly a grueling and stressful time for everyone. Much of this stress comes from high level or AP classes. High achieving students are pushing themselves to the limit with five to six AP classes, a job, and clubs or sports. AP classes are difficult and time-consuming, so many people question whether or not AP classes are as important as they are made out to be. Are a temporary lack of sleep and an immense amount of stress worth the benefits of AP classes?

Stress is a natural feeling, but the amount that students face nowadays is definitely not healthy. Working students and student athletes alike spend their evenings at their job or with their team, come home to hours of homework, then have to wake up after five to six hours of sleep and do it all again. This schedule is tough but very real to many students, so it has been normalized by both students and parents. Junior Gabby Harrison believes that AP classes are beneficial to students who are passionate about the class topic. She said, “I think that AP classes are important, but you really only learn the best when you are actually interested in the class. There is no reason to stress about classes that will not help you during college.” This point of view is shared among many students. Sometimes the stress does not seem worth the few benefits of those classes.

Students push themselves as hard as possible. The stress of school can affect their attitude, which directly affects other aspects of their lives. College is not all about AP classes, and it is important for students to realize that they are able to be successful even if they do not have a lot of AP classes under their belts. The important thing for students to do is to study hard and put the best effort possible into classes that are important to them. High school is not forever, so students should not feel the kind of unhealthy stress that often comes with it.

About the Writer
Amanda Wampler, Staff Reporter

Amanda Wampler is a junior and a second year staff reporter for The Herald. She is also the co-editor of the yearbook. Born in Westerville, Ohio, she moved to South Carolina when she was 13. She is passionate about learning different languages and about new cultures. Though she may not know who she wants to be yet, she dreams of college in a big city and traveling in her adult life. In her free time, you can find her reading countless novels, drinking lots of iced coffee, and/or enjoying time with her friends. Amanda is excited to see what junior year brings her way, and is ready to take part in The Herald newspaper again. 

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