Isabella+Ortiz+%2811%29+looks+over+her+written+notes+while+Nigel+Ice+%2812%29+stares+in+confusion
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Taking Notes vs. Listening in Class: Which is Better?

Isabella Ortiz (11) looks over her written notes while Nigel Ice (12) stares in confusion

Isabella Ortiz (11) looks over her written notes while Nigel Ice (12) stares in confusion

Luna Riley

Isabella Ortiz (11) looks over her written notes while Nigel Ice (12) stares in confusion

Luna Riley

Luna Riley

Isabella Ortiz (11) looks over her written notes while Nigel Ice (12) stares in confusion

Taking Notes vs. Listening in Class: Which is Better?

January 18, 2019

The Greatness of Paper Notes

Ann+Elise+Moody+%2811%29+takes+notes+on+pottery+for+Art+3+Honors.
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The Greatness of Paper Notes

Ann Elise Moody (11) takes notes on pottery for Art 3 Honors.

Ann Elise Moody (11) takes notes on pottery for Art 3 Honors.

Isabella Ortiz Calzada

Ann Elise Moody (11) takes notes on pottery for Art 3 Honors.

Isabella Ortiz Calzada

Isabella Ortiz Calzada

Ann Elise Moody (11) takes notes on pottery for Art 3 Honors.

Since the very beginning of time, notes have been something physical, something that students can use for reference any time they want. Notes are convenient to travel around with, and even though individual paper can be hard to keep up with, it can be easily organized in a binder. The clear truth is that taking paper notes in class is way better than having to go to remember everything that a teacher says. Auditory notes may be convenient when students are feeling too lazy to write, but the material is not absorbed as well. Taking notes is not difficult, either. The complexity of remembering every bit of a subject’s material is something a high school student should not be concerned with, considering all the current stress they have as a teenager. It would be just as easy to write down the notes as they are being presented. Freshman Emma Umberger says, “Note taking benefits you for classes because, as you’re taking notes, you can get in in your mind and it is easy to pull it back out to review for a test.” So while taking in the widely known viewpoint of most Wade Hampton high school students, there would be no point in even further discussing auditory notes, the best choice is the printed choice especially if one is looking to memorize the information over a long period of time.

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    Listen Up, Students

    Learning+varies+from+student+to+student+the+photo+above+shows+off+each+from%3A+https%3A%2F%2Frealtoru.edu%2Fscience-smart-people-learn%2F
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    Listen Up, Students

    Learning varies from student to student the photo above shows off each from: https://realtoru.edu/science-smart-people-learn/

    Learning varies from student to student the photo above shows off each from: https://realtoru.edu/science-smart-people-learn/

    Real Editor

    Learning varies from student to student the photo above shows off each from: https://realtoru.edu/science-smart-people-learn/

    Real Editor

    Real Editor

    Learning varies from student to student the photo above shows off each from: https://realtoru.edu/science-smart-people-learn/

    Every student learns in their own way. Some like to have a colorful notebook full of notes, highlighted with a whole system of what each color represents, and some prefer to listen to their teacher or listen to a video that explains everything they are learning. I believe that learning and taking notes by listening is far easier than hand jamming everything the teacher is saying. Listening carefully and remembering the important bits and pieces can be far easier.

    Some teachers in Wade Hampton use videos to help explain what they teach. Mr. Willey, for example, posts videos that he records and uploads to his Google Classroom where he explains and shows his students how to work with the programs they use in his digital media classes. With studies showing that twenty-five percent of students are auditory learners, having opportunities like this is important for public schools. Not only do auditory learners have an easier time taking notes, but they also save money on school supplies every year and they save the environment because they do not use paper to take their notes. Students who write down their notes can lose their notes or have them ruined, but auditory learners keep everything safe in their brain.

    Jennifer Weichel is an extension specialist at MSU and she wrote an article about auditory learners with tips and tricks on making learning for them easier. The article also points out the many places in the real world that uses auditory learning to their advantage. She states the following in her article, “Many corporate trainers use this method, they just pick a different tune or gimmick and help their clients achieve the same feeling of success. So take it to heart and put those ears to work, picking up the best that sound has to offer so you can soar as a student, parent, employee or volunteer.“ Overall, learning and taking notes by using ears instead of a pen and paper can make a students life much easier.

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