Open Letter to People Who Park in Handicapped Spots

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Open Letter to People Who Park in Handicapped Spots

Rachel Glynn (11) gets upset, justifiably, when people without a disability park in handicapped spots.

Rachel Glynn (11) gets upset, justifiably, when people without a disability park in handicapped spots.

Rachel Glynn (11) gets upset, justifiably, when people without a disability park in handicapped spots.

Rachel Glynn (11) gets upset, justifiably, when people without a disability park in handicapped spots.

Herald Staff Member

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To anyone this applies to, buckle your seatbelts, folks, this one is going to be a doozy. Out of all the things that annoy me when it comes to people’s driving, seeing someone who is not handicapped parked in a designated handicapped spot takes the cake for being the most annoying. Some people speed, some people cut others off, some may even drive twenty in a forty. While all these things are annoying, none even compare to the act of taking a spot that is not yours simply because it is a convenience to you, and that, my friends, is the tea.

I get it, you were probably in a hurry. You woke up late, the train held you back, your siblings took too long to get ready. You really had to be at a meeting five minutes ago but found yourself stuck in horrible traffic. You pull into the parking lot, and it seems as though every spot is filled, except for a few at the very front. Those few blue-lined spots seem to be calling to you as if it only makes sense that you park in them. What would the harm be? you may ask yourself. Everyone is already here, what could possibly go wrong?

The truth of the matter is, there are many things that could, in fact, go very wrong, and the only one at fault would be you. More people than we realize have limiting, even debilitating, disabilities that prevent them from doing many of the things we do every day that we do not even think twice about. Parking at the front of the parking lot, while it may be a simple convenience to you, may be a matter of necessity for someone else.

Sincerely,

A law abiding citizen

P.S. To all you students out there that park in the student parking lot without a pass, you are not sneaky, and you are really only adding to the issue. Next time you go to park, think to yourself, Is my life really more important than anyone else’s? Does my convenience hold precedence over other people’s needs?